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Tips for Surviving Daylight Savings Time (Spring Forward)

VERY excited about Daylight Savings this weekend, as it’s time to Spring Forward!  Which also means, we lose an hour.  Turning your clock one hour ahead every spring isn’t easy. Luckily, solutions are not out of reach. In a society already suffering from lack of sleep, it’s the simple things that can make a big difference. The tips below are the Better Sleep Council’s trusted solutions to avoid daylight savings time sleepiness that can make the upcoming time change – and every other morning – easier to handle.  Here are some tips:

 

  • Gradually Transition into the Time Change
    To minimize the impact of the switch to daylight saving time, make gradual adjustments. Go to bed 15 minutes early, starting several days before the change.
  • Sleepy? Take a Quick Nap
    If you feel sleepy after the change to daylight saving time, take a short nap in the afternoon – no more than 20 minutes long.
  • Commit to 7-8 Hours of Sleep
    The average adult needs 7-8 hours of quality sleep each and every night. Work backward from your wake time and commit to getting at least 7 hours of sleep every night.
  • Keep Regular Sleep Hours
    Make sleep a priority by keeping consistent sleep (bedtime) and wake schedules – even on the weekends.
  • Exercise during the Day
    Even moderate exercise, such as walking, can help you sleep better. Just make sure you don’t work out within two hours of bedtime.
  • More tips (HERE).

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AboutShellie Hart

Your workday host is a longtime Seattle Radio Midday Air-Personality. Shellie grew up in Burien and now lives in West Seattle. She’s the on-court Entertainment Emcee for our 2X WNBA Championship Team SEATTLE STORM. Shellie is also committed to Children’s Hospital with weekly participation in their CHILD LIFE Program, dedicating over a 100 hours of volunteer time annually. People ask all the time, “What’s your favorite part of the job?”, and my response is YOU! Sure I get to meet all kinds of famous people, but it’s engaging with the people and their Northwest families that makes me happy”